Sunday, December 14, 2008

Enough


As many people across the country loose their jobs the tornado of news and reports is grim. Even for our family, I think it scares us that our friends, our neighbors, or even we could loose our incomes. Perhaps to feel better, to feel more informed or more prepared I've been listening to NPR day and night. And one story has me so worked up.

Of course it outlined the current job market in the United States and ended with an expert literally saying, "There is not enough work to do." I guess he doesn't live at my house. One thing is for sure, in the coming year people living in the U.S. will learn what that really means. But I believe there is plenty of work to be done. There may not be enough compensation, but there is always enough work to go around.

Our inability to work for the sake of working is one of the reasons we're in the situation we're in now. Households have stopped doing for themselves. How many people do you know who raise their own vegetables, bake their own bread, can their own food, sew their own clothes, clean their own houses, cut their own grass. There is an art to domesticity and it has been lost in this country. There are a few pockets remaining, here and there, and these individuals are to be admired for the value they place in doing for themselves -- even when they can afford to pay someone else to do it.

There is no shame in doing the simple, menial tasks of running your home. There is enough work. Do it.

11 comments:

laurel said...

Amen sister!!!!!

Glenda said...

Thank you for putting into words what I attempted to teach to my posterity through actions. For many years I did not think you were learning, but obviously, I was wrong. You seem to have learned it very well; however, probably on your own after you left home!

Patti said...

So well said! And you are proof. You are a domestic goddess! :) You've got skills and I envy them.

Rachel said...

You need to open your home to teach women all the things you do. And you need to send me one of the cinnamon rolls. They look scrumptious.

Rachel said...

P.S. I love your Etsy goods. I want to buy all of them.

Elle said...

Yes! By the way, I'm an NPR addict too.

grandma GiGI said...

Cinnamon rolls, Wow! Is there anything you "can't do? Love it.

Angenette said...

I was just talking to Dan yesterday about how there are HELP WANTED signs everywhere around us, at 7eleven, at Shopko, at places people wouldn't *dream* of working because they have a degree or they demand x amounts of money a year... yet so many people are saying they are out of work and can't find a job.
Not reallywhat your post is about but it made me think on that a little more.

Adamo said...

Such a great post. Claudia and I watched all the 1900s house, Victorian house, etc. And one thing was universal. The women all hated their assigned roles (which in those days was more difficult). They always said it was demeaning. The work they did was mostly you know feed their families, keep the house sanitized, and even scrubbed every nook and cranny to minimize the chance of contracting disease. The men complained of how diffucult and laborious there work was. But I always watched and envied at how self sustained they must of felt. How fulfilling their work must have been. Good post.

Claudia said...

I, too, love this post. Isn't it sad that women in this country (myself included) sometimes feel like feel it is a shameful thing to be "just" a stay-at-home mom/"housewife"? I've fallen into that trap, even though I would NEVER consider myself a career minded person. If there is one thing I admire about this extended family of yours that I've been blessed to join is what fantastic, strong, and accomplished women you all are, and how impressed I am in all the work you do for yourselves--it is literally inspiring and to me is a badge of honor!

T.Tonn said...

I think it is about time the words "Homemaker, or house wife" get a makeover! It would be nice to have a term that is viewed as less oppressing, a less female oriented definition that can also include the "stay at home male" and feel more respected when spoken. Also, let us not make the hardworking, single parents feel guiltier, than some already do, about not being able to spend more home time with their beloved kids. Think balanced and equal opportunity. Those of us that can stay at home, and enjoy our homes, and make beautiful homes are blessed. Let's try to lend a helping hand to those households that need a little help. It takes a village, right? A most stimulating post, Julia.